The Ultimate Guide To Heating Options For Your Home

The Ultimate Guide To Heating Options For Your Home

When faced with a decision, its always best for a homeowner to know their options. It seems like whether its choosing a stylish tile for your floor, deciding exactly where to put each piece of furniture, or selecting the correct heating system. Your choices matter greatly. This is why its always best to know every option. Even when it comes to your home heating. But, finalizing a decision without exploring every possible choice can leave you wondering if you made the correct one.

As a homeowner, feeling like your home heating choice isn’t up to par can lead to wasted money, lost time, and needless frustration. To make matters worse, finding the data necessary to make the right choice can cause a big headache. Not to mention knowing how to apply this data correctly to your situation is almost impossible. When it comes to knowing heating options, nobody wants to left out in the cold.

Christian Brothers wants every homeowner to know exactly what their options are with heating systems. We know how valuable information can be when it is accurate and easy enough to understand. This is why we’ve put together the ultimate basic guide describing each heating option for your home:

Fireplaces

We’ll start with the basics. Great for decoration and overall comfort, a fireplace fits any home perfectly. However, due to modern technological upgrading, fireplaces are not recommended as a primary heat source. Although great for a family gatherings, you may want a more convenient source of warmth for your home.

Space Heaters

Electric space heaters are very convenient and easy to use. They move easily around the house due to their small size and light weight. Furthermore, they heat a small area very quickly to provide maximum comfort.

Being quartz infrared or oil filled most of the time, these heaters deliver heat converted by electricity. This may sound great, but it comes with a steep price. Space heaters are cheap to buy initially, but your electric bill will skyrocket if they are used too much.

If you were to use a 1,500 watt electric heater for an hour, your electricity cost would go up in cents by 50%. This isn’t the only reason why space heaters aren’t a valid recommendation. They can be a worrisome fire threat as well. Plus, they don’t heat the entire home. They only provide small areas with heat.

Boilers

Operating as both air and water heaters, boilers distribute heat by circulating warm water through radiators and other devices. These radiators are typically located in bedrooms and offices. When the water circulating into these devices eventually cools down, it streams into the boiler again. This reheating process ensures your boiler is running at top efficiency. Similarly to other types of heaters, a boilers heat source is usually natural gas or oil based heat.

Boilers are perfect if you choose to have radiant floor heating. If you have a steam boiler, the process is a tad different. This boiler creates steam which is carried into the home through ducts and vents. This type of boiler isn’t used very commonly any more due to the more convenient options of heating that are becoming more popular.

Regular boiler heating systems come with their own set of pros and cons. They are typically easier to install if you’re looking to put “zone” thermostats in your home. With zone thermostats, you’re able to control the temperature of a single room. This can be useful when it comes to managing the heat production in your home. However, the cost of boilers is substantially more than most other heat sources.

Heat Pumps

Normally described as a two way air conditioner, heat pumps can provide coolness to your home in the summer as well as heat for you in the winter. They do this by simply removing hot air from the home. Thanks to an electric device attached to the mechanism that ejects improper temperature air outside, this system is ideal if you want an option that works relatively similarly to central air. When it comes to heat pumps, you have a couple of different options.

The first option is an air source based heat pump. This option operates much like the previous paragraph explained. Cold air is taken from outside the home, charged by an electrical component, and pushed into the home. In the summer, warm air is removed from the home. The installation process for this is relatively similar to that of central air.

The other option is purchasing a geothermal heat pump. Geothermal heat pumps work by taking heat from underground and converting it into warm air. The expenses that come from installing and maintaining geothermal heat pumps are very high. Due to the high expenses, this heat pump is not a great recommendation.

Furnaces

Central heat furnaces heat most of the homes in the United States, and for a good reason. They are the number one recommendation for most homes because of their “forced warm air distribution system”. Their high recommendation also comes from their growing technological efficiency over the past thirty years. Furnaces create warm air by mixing it with burning oil. Pushing the air through the vents and ducts of the ventilation system, they are able to heat every part of the house.  A fan propels the warm air from one part of the house to the other.

A furnace can also be completely controlled with the help of a thermostat, making them even more convenient than fireplaces, heat pumps, or electric heaters. Furnace efficiency can also be measured more accurately using the AFUE measurement. The higher the percentage calculated, the better efficiency at which the furnace runs. Furnaces are a number one recommendation when it comes to heating.

Call Us

If you have any questions regarding heating, electricity bills, or HVAC systems, give us a call! We can set you up with an HVAC technician who specializes in air conditiong, heating, and customer service. You can reach us at (623) 499- 9794.

Air conditioning, Plumbing, Electrical repair since 1976 in Phoenix, AZ.


What Kept Houses Cool Before Air Conditioning?

What Kept Houses Cool Before Air Conditioning?

Many of us take air conditioning for granted. It’s easy to forget that before central air systems were commonplace throughout America, many people went their entire lives without enjoying the cool, refreshing indoor air provided by good air conditioning units.

Humans have been trying to keep cool for as long as we have recorded history. Even though air conditioning and central air are relatively new additions to the modern residential dwelling, we’ve been finding innovative and exciting ways to manage the temperature for hundreds of years.

Keep reading to see our favorite ways that generations before us kept cool without the benefits of AC:

Wraparound Porch
Stone Walls
Cross Ventilation
High Ceiling

Wraparound Porches

Most houses built after WWII tended to have large, covered front porches or wraparound porches attached to them. While these porches are used largely for decoration these days, decades ago they were critical for keeping cool and getting a good night’s sleep.

It wasn’t uncommon for individuals and even entire families to migrate out onto the porches at night to sleep and enjoy the (slightly) cooler evening air, rather than be trapped in a musty, humid house.

Higher Ceilings

Some modern homes have high ceilings which are purely for aesthetic purposes, but there’s a good reason that many “character” homes and apartment complexes have towering ceilings and windows: air circulation. We all know that hot air rises, so the higher the ceiling, the more top up the heat can go, keeping the floor a little cooler. Not just that, but taller ceilings allowed for taller windows; tall, narrow windows improve air flow and move more air through a room than the short, stout windows we see in most homes today.

Stone Walls

If you could afford it, building tall houses with thick walls made of stone and brick were commonplace to insulate homes and help keep them cool during the warm months. Many older homes have walls which are between 12-24 inches thick, and by building them with stone and bricks they were able to absorb heat during the day and release the heat at night once the evening set in. This also helps explain why some brick homes are so expensive to purchase: the added insulation (bricks) helps keep energy costs low.

Cross Ventilation

Cross-ventilation is the practice of placing inlets and outlets (usually strategically placed windows and doors) to optimize the flow of air through a building. For example, the famous “shotgun houses” in New Orleans weren’t just built tall and narrow to avoid the high property taxes; the strategically-placed windows allowed for optimal airflow and helped homeowners beat the Southern heat.

Stay comfortable with the help of qualified professionals and call (623) 201-5066 to reach Christian Brothers Plumbing, Air Conditioning, and Electrical in Glendale, AZ for fast, efficient solutions.

Air conditioning, Plumbing, Electrical repair since 1976 in Phoenix, AZ.


Are You Aware of the New HVAC Technologies?

The Latest HVAC Technologies

Residential HVAC systems have been around for quite some time, but that doesn’t there isn’t any room for improvement. Countless new upgrades and features have made these systems more efficient and useful than ever.

Glendale, AZ Heating-and-Cooling-System-TechnologiesHere is a closer look at some of the hottest new HVAC technology and what it can do for your and your family.

WiFi Thermostat

Long gone are the days in which someone actually has to be at your home’s thermostat to adjust the temperature.

WiFi thermostats allow Glendale homeowners to control their HVAC system from anywhere in the world through their smartphone or tablet PC.

In addition to being extremely convenient, these devices can also save you money by giving you full control over when the heating and cooling systems turn on and off. These devices can also provide useful feedback such as when the air filters need to be changed or if the system needs to be serviced.

Ductless Mini-Split Air Conditioners

In many Glendale homes and businesses, it is not practical to have ducts running to every single room in the building. This is why many people have turned to ductless mini-split air conditioners for zoned climate control. Instead of drawing in cold air from a centralized system, these devices produce the cold air on their own.

They are installed on an outward facing wall and pull in the air without using ducts. For many families, this will save quite a bit of money as they are only cooling a single room instead of their whole house.

Radiant Heating

Radiant heating is not exactly a new concept, but this technology is now being applied to a variety of amazing new HVAC devices. Unlike traditional furnaces, radiant heaters do not use a heating source such as an open flame to keep the house warm. Instead, these heaters actually produce the same rays as the sun.

They can be installed in walls, floors, or even the ceiling for zoned climate control. Radiant heaters also begin working instantly and will stay warm for quite some time after they have been turned off. Due to the fact that they do not have any moving parts, they require very little maintenance and rarely break down.

If you are a resident of Glendale, AZ would like to learn more about some of the latest HVAC technology,call Christian Brothers Plumbing, Air Conditioning, and Electrical today at (623) 201-5066.

Air conditioning, Plumbing, Electrical repair since 1976 in Phoenix, AZ.